Saturday, August 11

Prehistoric Footprints on Formby Beach, Liverpool


prehistoric footprints formby beach
This place is great!

There’s a fierce wind that whips around the coast at Formby Point creating these immense and restless sand dunes.  Pinewoods shelter the coastline, the sun is bright and high.

This place shelters another secret….prehistoric footprints and it’s the draw of finding these that has pulled us out to explore with the children.

Clear, deep footprints in the mud on the beach look freshly made but these are the 10,000 year old tracks of hunter-gatherers chasing deer, wild boar and mighty aurochs.  Caught in a snap shot of their lives each print has baked hard under the sun and been covered by silt carried in by the tides until coastal erosion has caused them to re-appear.

It’s a glimpse of another world of those who have gone before: other children, women, men as they ran and played in the mud such a raw connection with our pre-historic past.  Makes us tingle all over, it’s a profoundly moving experience.

But eating a Paleo diet is not about re-enactment,  it’s about eating, truly living and exploring in today’s world.  Remembering our ancestors those who have lived before, remembering their strength and agility, acts like a compass or a guide in this our modern world.  When you shop at the store simply ask yourself this:  would our ancestors recognise this as food?  If the answer is no then ask yourself, should you?

3 comments:

Gary Conway said...

Locations like this are so cool! You right some people get caught up on the caveman re-enactment. Many foods we eat now wont have been available then but are still paleo. It's about using our past to develop good healthy principles for the present.

Gary Conway said...

Locations like this are so cool! You right some people get caught up on the caveman re-enactment. Many foods we eat now wont have been available then but are still paleo. It's about using our past to develop good healthy principles for the present.

Gordon Roberts said...

May I make a small correction to the text regarding the age of the footprints preserved in the foreshore sediments at Formby Point? They date from the late-Mesolithic (c.5000 BC) to the late-Neolithic (c.3000 BC). At Lifeboat Road, however, one can occasionally see in the dune edge an Iron Age peat outcrop (dated 900 BC - 100 BC) containing the hoofprints of domestic oxen.